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13 Best Executed Vector Illustrations

Vector artwork involves a lot of hard work and a knack for thinking outside of the box. It ranges from the photo-realistic to the very abstract. Almost all vector artwork is dazzling. It focuses on details and lighting as well as surface gradients.

 Alexandar Johnson

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Leeds based designer Alexandar Johnson created this clever Moby Dick book cover for the classic tale Moby Dick. Including both the harpoon and the whale’s tale, it’s simple, striking and brilliantly unique.

Tang Yau Hoong

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Tang Yau Hoong is an artist, illustrator, graphic designer living in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. With a passion for creative thinking, he creates art that is conceptual, surreal and fun in a simplistic and unique way.

Ben Farrow

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Ben Farrow is an anthropomorphic artist and graphic designer whose work focuses primarily on vector art. This brilliantly simple execution of the Titanic is a clever way of using negative space with more than a hint of art nouveau.

Troy DeShano

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Troy DeShano has created tonnes of negative space art but it’s this creation, based on Hitchcock’s ‘The Birds’, that caught our eye. We love the intergration of her hair with the silouhettes of flying birds.

Caroline Remy

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“The firm specialises in cattle,” explains Belgian designerCaroline Remy. “But its image among customers is for smaller animals. The customer wanted to hide the cow, which is why it must append two cards to replenish the logo.”

 Harvey Esparcia

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This simple yet striking logo design is the personal logo study from Filipino designer Harvey Esparcia who uses negative space to combine his initial letters.

Painting the Universe

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An out-of-this-world example of negative space, the striking white space matched with the beautiful, eccentric colours make this an unforgettable execution from designer Philipp Rietz.

Flying far, far away

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This negative space design from illustrator and artist Ale M is a subtle and wholly beautiful offering that shows a splash of colour can make all the difference. We love the clever use of perspective.

 Songbird

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Designer Tang Yau Hoong uses a simple and straight-forward illustration style to get the most out of the negative space. Using just the two shades allows the clever negative space trick to jump out.

 Nature’s Choir

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This more intricate offering from illustrator and artist radiomode is as beautiful as they come. Using negative space to portray the beauty of nature, we especially love the attention to detail on the leaves.

300million

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Creative agency 300million delivers work that is intelligent, looks good and gets results. A great example is The Guild of Food Writers’ logo, the replacement of the pen’s nib with a spoon shape creates a simple, clever and impactful logo.

Spartan Golf Club

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Richard Fonteneau is a graphic designer based in Lexington, USA. The Spartan Golf Club is a perfect example of well executed negative space in a logo design. The arc appears to be the top of a Spartans warriors helmet, also the making of the golfer’s driving swing. And do you notice anything about the face of this Spartan?

FedEx Logo

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The white arrow between the E and the X is piercing once seen. This ‘hidden arrow’ conveys the dynamic attributes that maintains FedEx leadership. The logo has won ample design awards and is constantly featured in ‘best logos’ lists. The logo was originally designed by Lindon Leader in 1994, he feels the sole purpose of branding is to facilitate the realisation of a client’s strategic marketing objectives. The work his studio creates “is not decorative or cosmetic”.

 Fiat

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We’re used to seeing highly creative and quality work come from worldwide ad agency Leo Burnett. So it’s no surprise that the team in Brazil have come up trumps once again with this brilliantly clever new campaign for car manufacturer Fiat, which encourages drivers not to send text messages while drving.

 Day vs Night

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Tang Yau Hoong is a self taught illustrator born and based in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. Experimenting and playing with negative space and illusion in her artwork, she has developed a series of mesmerising illustrations. Tang Yau Hoong’s work is mostly conceptual, surreal and minimalist with an interesting colour palette.

 

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